Chiefs Hall of Honor

AFL

Home of the Chiefs

COTTON BOWL (1960-1962)

LOCATION
    Texas State Fairgrounds, Dallas, Texas
PRESEASON RECORD
    1-0-0 (1.000)
REGULAR SEASON RECORD
    15-6-0 (.714)
POSTSEASON RECORD
    0-0-0 (.000)
ALL GAMES
    16-6-0 (.727)
CAPACITY
    75,504 (1962 – Final Season)
CONSTRUCTION DATA
    Opened – 1923
    Upper Deck Added – 1948-49
Cotton Bowl

COTTON BOWL (1960-1962)

1960-1962

The Cotton Bowl served as the home of the American Football League’s Dallas Texans from 1960 to 1962 before the franchise moved to Kansas City prior to the 1963 season and became known as the Chiefs. The Texans shared the stadium with the NFL’s expansion Dallas Cowboys. The facility served until 1999 as the home field of SMU, the alma mater of Chiefs founder Lamar Hunt. The Texans final contest in the Cotton Bowl was a 26-17 win over the San Diego Chargers on December 16, 1962, before a sparse crowd of 18,384 fans.

Above, right: Texans Season Tickets Order Form, 1960

MUNICIPAL STADIUM (1963-1971)

LOCATION
    22nd and Brooklyn – Kansas City, Missouri
PRESEASON RECORD
    11-3-1 (.767)
REGULAR SEASON RECORD
    44-16-3 (.722)
POSTSEASON RECORD
    0-1-0 (.000)
ALL GAMES
    55-20-4 (.722)
CAPACITY
    49,002 (1971 – Final Season)
CONSTRUCTION DATA
    Opened – 1923
    Upper Deck Added – 1954-55
Municipal Stadium

MUNICIPAL STADIUM (1963-1971)

FLASHBACK: 1962

Municipal Stadium served as the Chiefs original home in Kansas City after previously housing two short-lived professional football franchises, the Kansas City Blues (1924) and the Kansas City Cowboys (1925-26). The Chiefs and the Kansas City Athletics baseball club shared the facility until the A’s departed for Oakland following the 1967 season. Kansas City went undefeated (7-0) at home during the 1971 season but the final contest (and only playoff game played there) in Municipal Stadium’s history will live in infamy for Chiefs fans, a devastating double overtime, 27-24 playoff loss to the Miami Dolphins on Christmas Day of 1971, a contest which remains the NFL’s longest game at 82 minutes, 40 seconds.

MUNICIPAL STADIUM (1963-1971)

Municipal Stadium Seating, preserved in the Hall of Honor

Arrowhead Stadium (1972-present)

LOCATION
    One Arrowhead Drive, Kansas City, Missouri
PRESEASON RECORD
    48-41-1 ( )
REGULAR SEASON RECORD
    176-124-1 ( )
POSTSEASON RECORD
    2-4-0 ( )
ALL GAMES
    224-165-2 ( )
CAPACITY
    76,416 approx. (Present) Upper Level – 34,356 Club Level – 7,715 Lower Level – 31,587 Suites & Boxes – 2,758 50,000 seats between end zones
LUXURY SUITES
126 (Includes 22 field boxes)
Monday Night Football Opening

Arrowhead Stadium (1972-present)

Arrowhead Stadium seating

Arrowhead Stadium (1972-present)

At the time of its dedication in ’72, the legendary founder of the Chicago Bears, George Halas called Arrowhead, “the most revolutionary, futuristic, sports complex I have ever seen.” Hal Lebovitz, Sports Editor of the Cleveland Plain Dealer added, “It took courage to sell the citizens of Kansas City on the twin park plan. But they bought it because they want the best.”

“the most revolutionary, futuristic, sports complex I have ever seen.”

In the late ’60s, Kansas City opted to construct two separate stadiums, one for football and one for baseball, a concept conceived by the late Charles Deaton, the Colorado-based architect. Voters approved the Sports Complex bond issue in ’67, which included plans for a

revolutionary concept – the world’s first rolling stadium roof. Construction cost overruns and project delays caused by a lengthy strike eventually forced the roof concept to be put on hold, but Arrowhead was completed in time for the ’72 season.

The stadium underwent a $375 million dollar renovation beginning in August of 2007 and was completed in time for the opening of the 2010 season. The stadium’s original artificial turf field was previously replaced by grass in 1994.